Cyber Security Tip: NEVER use the same password twice

Cyber Security Tip: NEVER use the same password twice

Mar 12, 2024

A complex password is a necessity but hard to remember. And with so many websites requiring a password these days, users often reuse the same password again and again with different sites. BAD idea.

When a big company gets hacked (like LinkedIn, for example), the criminals post and sell the username, e-mail, password and confidential information in that account. Since many people reuse the same password, hackers will try that e-mail and password combination across multiple sites, including Amazon, PayPal or other sites where you might store credit card information.

Remember, they aren’t doing this manually. They have highly sophisticated software to automate ALL of this. If you want a better way of storing and organizing UNIQUE passwords, we recommend using a password management system. DO NOT store your passwords in Excel files, Word files or within your Outlook. These are super easy for attackers to break into.

The bottom line is that no matter how much of a pain it is, it is very important to have different passwords for each online account – and make sure they are TRULY unique, not just with a system like using the first letter of the site or simply adding “1” or an “!” as an extra character. Hackers will often get access to multiple passwords at once and these patterns become obvious very quickly.

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