Cyber Security Tip: This is an easy mistake that can cost you big

Cyber Security Tip: This is an easy mistake that can cost you big

Here’s a sneaky trick used by many hackers: they purchase and set up a fraudulent website that is a close misspelling of a legitimate one.

Example: www.faceboook.com (extra “o”) or www.dropbox.net (instead of .com).

All you have to do is accidentally fat-finger ONE letter in the URL and up pops a very legitimate-looking fake copy of the site you were trying to get to – and the login and links are full of keylogger malware and virus land mines waiting for you to click on. This is particularly important for any social networks you belong to.

To prevent this, we can install an advanced security solution that BLOCKS sites that are suspicious and fraudulent. That way, even if you click on a link to a phishing site, get directed to an infected site or accidentally type in the wrong URL, the site will be blocked, protecting you and your employees.

Remember: with users working all over the place, you will need more than just a sophisticated corporate firewall. You will need an advanced security solution on each of the computers that are working remotely to keep hackers from getting to your users’ data.

Have questions about cyber security or some other IT-related issues? Book Now to book a quick, 10-minute session, or call 480-999-5468 to speak to someone now.

Cyber Security Tip: If you installed it, you must update it!

Cyber Security Tip: If you installed it, you must update it!

There are thousands of hackers who get up every morning with ONE goal in mind: to find a new vulnerability in a commonly installed software (like Adobe, Microsoft Office, Chrome, QuickBooks, etc.) to gain access to MILLIONS of their users.

That’s why these companies frequently issue patches and updates for KNOWN security flaws, and once a KNOWN vulnerability is announced via a patch, hackers get to work like crazy trying to figure out how to use the vulnerability and access those users who are lazy about installing updates. That’s why it’s important to update installed software programs as soon as possible.

Of course, if you’re a client of ours, we’re monitoring your network for these updates and installing them for you, but your home computers, smartphone and other devices that may NOT be under our protection will require you to be diligent about updates and patches.

Have questions about cyber security or some other IT-related issues? Book Now to book a quick, 10-minute session, or call 480-999-5468 to speak to someone now.

Cyber Security Tip: What is the “dark web” anyway?

Cyber Security Tip: What is the “dark web” anyway?

The “dark web” or “deep web” is a part of the World Wide Web we know and love that is accessible ONLY via a special software that allows users and website operators to remain completely anonymous and untraceable. That’s why it’s the playground for hackers, cybercriminals, drug deals, human trafficking and more.

Because hacking IS a for-profit business, there are criminal entities that steal, combine and sell personal information on the dark web, like passwords, social security numbers, bank account information and credit cards.

If your network or one of the people in your company has been breached, your password and other credentials will show up on the dark web.

This week’s tip is simple: find out what data you have on the dark web before someone uses it to gain more access to your systems – but be careful! Some websites offering this are scams designed to con you into giving private credentials.

If you want to know what’s out there on the dark web about you, your company and your employees, hit “Reply” and we’ll do a free dark web scan for you.

Have questions about cyber security or some other IT-related issues? Book Now to book a quick, 10-minute session, or call 480-999-5468 to speak to someone now.

Cyber Security Tip: How to spot a phishing e-mail

Cyber Security Tip: How to spot a phishing e-mail

A phishing e-mail is a bogus e-mail that is carefully designed to look like a legitimate request (or attached file) from a site you trust in an effort to get you to willingly give up your login information to a particular website or to click and download a virus.

Often these e-mails look 100% legitimate and show up in the form of a PDF (scanned document) or a UPS or FedEx tracking number, bank letter, Facebook alert, bank notification, etc. That’s what makes these so dangerous – they LOOK exactly like a legitimate e-mail. So, how can you tell a phishing e-mail from a legitimate one? Here are a few telltale signs…

First, double-check the e-mail. You might discover that the e-mail from the boss is actually from a Gmail account and not the company e-mail.

Second, hover over the URL in the e-mail (but DON’T CLICK!) to see the ACTUAL website you’ll be directed to. If there’s a mismatched or suspicious URL, delete the e-mail immediately.

If you’re unsure, simply go directly to the site (typing it into your browser) rather than clicking on the link. Another telltale sign is poor grammar and spelling errors.

Have questions about cyber security or some other IT-related issues? Book Now to book a quick, 10-minute session, or call 480-999-5468 to speak to someone now.

Cyber Security Tip: What is this new “zero trust” thing?

Cyber Security Tip: What is this new “zero trust” thing?

Zero trust is a relatively new cyber security strategy that is rapidly becoming the security model of choice for businesses. In fact, we anticipate this to be the new standard to meet data protection compliance for all organizations, large and small.

Essentially the only application and logins allowed are those preapproved by you, and everything else is treated with zero trust, locking down your network. Here’s an example of how it works…

Imagine you own a shopping mall and want to protect it from a shooting, shoplifters or other bad people. You place cameras and guards by every door to monitor people coming in and out. Maybe you even have a metal detector.

Problem is, the doors are wide open and you are relying on the people running security to spot a bad guy, which means there’s room for error. How do you spot a shoplifter or mugger? They don’t wear a sign that says, “I’m a shoplifter!” as they enter the mall.

A zero trust environment ONLY lets the people into the mall who you know personally. You essentially have “zero trust” for anyone who wasn’t invited in, and you block them ALL except for those specific people (applications) you know and trust.

On a computer network, that means applications like Office or QuickBooks are allowed, but NOT something that is new or unvetted.

Have questions about cyber security or some other IT-related issues? Book Now to book a quick, 15-minute session, or call 480-999-5468 to speak to someone now.